3 Tools to Measure the Success of Your Corporate Sustainability Program - Good360

3 Tools to Measure the Success of Your Corporate Sustainability Program

 

Many companies initiate corporate sustainability programs without identifying proper metrics and considering how to monitor the success of the program in a substantial manner. The following three tools are all excellent resources to help you gauge the impact of your company’s initiatives.

For a thorough review process of your entire sustainability program, look to the Ceres Roadmap for Sustainability. Measure your company’s progress in relation to the 20 sustainability expectations for corporations by comparing your progress to specific companies in their Gaining Ground Report. Some of the expectations within are very specific, such as: “companies will obtain at least 30 percent of energy from renewable resources by 2020.” Other targets are more qualitative, such as: “Corporate boards will provide formal oversight for corporate sustainability strategy.”

Review your specific program strategies with the Product Sustainability Program Assessment courtesy of Pure Strategies, which helps your company identify the best strategies to accelerate the sustainability of their products. The web-based survey can be completed in less than ten minutes, and your results include customized recommendations for improvement. Examples of strategies from other companies that were successful are included as a jumping-off point. The global market research of Pure Strategies suggests that a common opportunity of improvement for most companies is linking sustainability to revenue.

Depending on your sector there are also industry-specific tools online that can the hotspots and opportunities for development in your field. If you work in the apparel industry you can utilize the Higg Index to track your sustainability. Academic institutions can take advantage of the STARS tool. The Retail Sustainability Management Leadership Model is one of the most advanced and helpful industry-specific tools available. 30 different areas of measurement contain five-step action plans to provide an instructive experience. Some examples of the category requirements within the Retail Industry Leaders Association’s model include: strategic partnerships address the needs of the supply chain workers, all products are designed with a cradle-to-cradle approach, and your profit and sustainability goals are quantitatively linked.

Of course, in order to track the growth and success of your corporate sustainability program you must start one. Find out how Good360 can help you take that step with minimal trouble – our online platform makes it easy for your organization to find nonprofits that can use your excess products for charitable causes and disaster relief efforts.

Sources: http://www.sustainablebrands.com/news_and_views/new_metrics/tara_gallagher/3_key_resources_benchmarking_your_sustainability_program

 


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Richard Barney, Good360’s EVP of Partnerships, is responsible for working closely with corporate partners to create programs that help them do good, better. Richard brings years of business-to-business sales and leadership experience to the nonprofit world and is tasked with ensuring that corporate partners realize a strong ROI from their partnership with Good360.
Richard Barney
Richard Barney
richard@good360.org

Richard Barney, Good360’s EVP of Partnerships, is responsible for working closely with corporate partners to create programs that help them do good, better. Richard brings years of business-to-business sales and leadership experience to the nonprofit world and is tasked with ensuring that corporate partners realize a strong ROI from their partnership with Good360.