Influential Women in the Nonprofit space - Good360

Influential Women in the Nonprofit space

March 8th is International Women’s Day and we are honored to recognize some of the incredible women within the Good360 nonprofit membership community.  This day is a global celebration of the social, economic, cultural and political achievements of women around the world, and we are delighted to highlight and thank women in our sector who help propel meaningful change and impact within their communities.  Each of these women are affiliated with one of Good360’s Community Redistribution Partners (CRPs) – community-based nonprofits that often serve a broad base of constituents and who help us redistribute critically needed goods as effectively and efficiently as possible. These women work every day to meet the needs of their communities affected by myriad issues and challenges, and their drive to give back is evident in their collective commitment to action. We are incredibly impressed by and grateful for their dedication and passion.

A recent post from Forbes magazine states “The gender gap in the nonprofit workplace is decreasing, and that is good news. However,  progress is slow, even in nonprofits where female employees are the majority of the workforce”. Highlighting women like these celebrates the important work that women are doing in this sector and highlights examples of committed, tireless female leadership.

Scroll below and learn a little bit more about their achievements, organizations and what this day means to them!

Karen Jayne, CEO
Stardust Non-Profit Building Supplies
www.stardustbuilding.org

1. What does International Women’s Day mean to you?
International Women’s Day celebrates the unique and special qualities and contributions of all women.

2. What inspired you to get into the nonprofit space?
I am inspired by the significant impact the nonprofit sector makes in our communities. I find it rewarding to know the work being done every day by so many people touches every aspect of life and fills such a wide variety of needs.

3. What would you say is your super power (unique quality) that you bring to your organization?
My unique quality is an unwavering focus on Stardust’s environmentally focused mission and our vision to some day live in a sustainable community where all usable materials are repurposed or reused.  Reuse can save the world!

4. What advice would you give to up-and-coming leaders in the nonprofit space?
Connect, Partner and Join!  This work can be very isolating.  Nonprofit leaders should find their local executive leader group, meet others in the sector, share successes and challenges and seek out partnerships that will enhance the work they are doing in their community.

Kimberly Tatum, Executive Director
Epiphany Soul
www.epiphanysoul.org

1. What does International Women’s Day mean to you?
It’s a celebration of women across the globe who are impacting the lives of others in a positive, meaningful and deliberate way. It’s the recognition of what it means to continuously show kindness, be selfless, love hard and embrace unique differences.

2. What inspired you to get into the nonprofit space?
Several years ago, I was asked to join a group on a trip to Central America to provide professional services (technology focused) to various organizations focused on improving the health, well-being and education of youth. The one thing that was common between all of the organizations was passion and
a genuine concern for others.  Shortly afterwards, I began to volunteer with local organizations focused on homeless individuals. Two years after giving my time to other organizations, my desire had grown beyond the work I was doing as a volunteer. I eventually acquired a space and launched Epiphany Soul.

3. What would you say is your super power (unique quality) that you bring to your organization?
I’m a visionary and I like to share my thoughts and goals with the board frequently. I depend fully on my staff/volunteers to execute and wouldn’t be as effective without them. Mega kudos to them.

4. What advice would you give to up-and-coming leaders in the nonprofit space?
Make a point to have conversations with other community organizations and leaders when you start up and nurture those relationships. Growth is inevitable when there is a team.

Vivian Fry, President
Shiloh Distribution Center
Operationcando2020.org

1. What does International Women’s Day mean to you?
It means that women are on the front lines working to help where ever there is a need directed by the Lord.

2. What inspired you to get into the nonprofit space?
The Lord called me to work in my current position and to help move good through the community and pay it forward instead of looking for a payout.

3. What would you say is your super power (unique quality) that you bring to your organization?
My super power is my winning mentality and using my faith to guide my way though any situation.

4. What advice would you give to up-and-coming leaders in the nonprofit space?
Trust in the lord with all your heart and lean not on your own understanding – Proverb 3.

Tanya Culp, Program Manager
Elmer Back Gifting Center
www.ebgc.org

1. What does International Women’s Day mean to you?
It is a time when women who have accomplished many great things are recognized for their outstanding work.

2. What inspired you to get into the nonprofit space?
My father was in it for over 35 years and I worked with him on a daily basis to supply those in need with the basics of everyday living.

3. What would you say is your super power (unique quality) that you bring to your organization?
I fully understand that many of the people we help are in their situations by no fault of their own.  I also realize that at any given time I may be in that situation.  I would want someone to lend me a helping hand to help me get back on my feet again.  In my heart of hearts I know I am doing the best I can to help someone’s life become a little better.

4. What advice would you give to up-and-coming leaders in the nonprofit space?
Always be aware of the fact these people are indeed people…not just some name on a piece of paper. Be aware of their feelings and always think “how would I feel if I was in their place”. Do not expect any kind of reward for doing what every person should be doing. You are no better than anyone else.  All of us are in this together…and together we can make sure the work we do is always focused on the individuals we help….not on ourselves.

Lauren S. Isbell, Community Partnerships Manager
Arkansas Early Learning
www.arearlylearning.org

1. What does International Women’s Day mean to you?
International Women’s Day is a day to celebrate solidarity among women and the progress that has been made in women’s rights.  It also inspires me to advocate for myself and my generation of working women and the daughters I am raising.  I’d love for them to see a world where #metoo no longer exists and glass ceilings are just shattered glass in the past.  We’ve got a lot of work to do to get there, but we, united in efforts like International Women’s Day are no doubt a force capable of changing the world.

2. What inspired you to get into the nonprofit space?
I’ve been involved with the ‘non-profit space’ since girlhood. I was a Brownie Girl Scout and went on to earn my Girl Scout Gold Award and was always challenged by those activities to leave the world better than you found it. When thinking about a career, I couldn’t imagine any other path than getting paid to change my corner of the world for the better.  The opportunities in this space have been good to me and I can’t wait to see where my career will lead.

3. What would you say is your super power (unique quality) that you bring to your organization?
A true extrovert, I never meet a stranger.  I am always sharing a (probably too elaborately long) story.  I’m a self proclaimed story-teller for our organization and use this to help people identify with what we do and why we do it. Through story-telling, people connect with our mission and understand our motives and are moved to action on our behalf.

4. What advice would you give to up-and-coming leaders in the nonprofit space?

  • Realize you can’t make all the mistakes yourself. Read, learn and grow from others as much as you can. My Audible account stays full of books that will help me be a better leader, employee and professional.
  • Understand that failure is part of the process.  Get comfortable with failing.  The growth it brings is worth it.
  • Find your cheerleaders.  You need people in your corner who are working along side you in the nonprofit world.  Maybe they are co-workers or women at a partnering organization, but lean in to those relationships. Nurture them and don’t take them for granted.
  • Be kind to yourself.  In this line of work, it is easy to “wear a lot of hats.” So many, oftentimes it is hard to do anything well.  Set office hours.  Turn off your phone. Prioritize self-care.  You can’t pour from an empty cup.

Lyuba Vasilyuk, Director of Humanitarian Service
Circle Of Caring Friends Charity
ccfcharity.org

1. What does International Women’s Day mean to you?
I was born and raised in the Eastern European Block where March 8th is celebrated as recognition of women’s qualities, rather than achievements. Today, I celebrate my achievements in the nonprofit space and I am forever grateful for the opportunities and support I have received from Good360. You gave me wings when I was ready to quit. You are my inspiration. Thank you!

2. What inspired you to get into the nonprofit space?
My motivation comes from the internal drive to do something bigger than myself, and also from my personal experience as an immigrant. My passion derives from the wish to give back to community and serve people that helped me find home in a new country and new culture. In serving others I  wish to express my gratitude to people that welcome me and so many others

3. What would you say is your super power (unique quality) that you bring to your organization?
My unique qualities are my organizational skills, willingness to learn, personal experience and cultural background. But my biggest strength is my intrinsic motivation. I have a vision and I follow my dream. Nothing will stop me!

4. What advice would you give to up-and-coming leaders in the nonprofit space?
I don’t  consider myself as an accomplished leader in the nonprofit space. I am a beginner. My advice to fellow beginners is – Be fearless! Listen to your inner voice and talk to your heart. Do not give up easily, learn from your mistakes , move on, do not look back. Do not get discouraged by criticism or lack of support from others. Follow your vision.

Stephanie Mastroianni, Executive Director
United Breast Cancer Foundation
www.ubcf.org

1. What does International Women’s Day mean to you?
Honoring the work, dedication, and intuitive nature women have and contribute to the world in all arenas of life. Included but not limited to business, government, education, creating change for the better, home and family matters. Women often manage the mundane maintenance of life to the  extraordinary. Small changes are made every day from our backyards to grander platforms regarding social and economic changes. I believe it all starts in the home, and love is very important.

2. What inspired you to get into the nonprofit space?
The desire to nurture and provide help where help is needed. To restore  love, appreciation, respect and most importantly dignity in a  person who is suffering or feels disenfranchised, or is unable to receive equal and proper care.

3. What would you say is your super power (unique quality) that you bring to your organization?
Naivety. The belief that there is no problem, only a solution.  Hard work and unwavering dedication during the most challenging times is critical. The will to overcome, be extremely creative, listen to others, but listen to my own heart and intuition.

4. What advice would you give to up-and-coming leaders in the nonprofit space?
Make sure this is something you want to give your life to.  It will consume you, be equally as exhausting as it is rewarding, and know that nothing is free because your in the NFP space. Everything you have, you have to work extra hard for, to prove your worth to have someone else invest their hard earned dollar, time, or energy  towards your cause and stand alongside you.

Lauren Brohmi, Executive Assistant
United Breast Cancer Foundation
www.ubcf.org

1. What does International Women’s Day mean to you?
International women’s day means women coming together celebrating other women and all of our great accomplishments.  Women are historically pitted against each other, but we are all stronger as a team than as one.

2. What inspired you to get into the nonprofit space?
For me, I truly love helping others and feel so blessed that I am able to marry my career with doing good in this world.

3. What would you say is your super power (unique quality) that you bring to your organization?
I would say my superpower is logistics.  I love to set a goal for the organization as well as myself and then the fun begins.  It is like a puzzle moving all the pieces around until everything fits. It is not always easy or fun but at the end of the day I ALWAYS keep a positive attitude and know that we will  make it happen.

4. What advice would you give to up-and-coming leaders in the nonprofit space?
I would say that you have to believe in and LOVE what you do.  If you have that love and drive then working crazy hours giving it your all doesn’t seem all that hard.

Beth Reichart, Director of Operations
United Breast Cancer Foundation
www.ubcf.org

1. What does International Women’s Day mean to you?
A day where we as a global community acknowledge and celebrate the diverse, creative, thoughtful, meaningful, and impactful contributions and achievements made by women worldwide positively affecting their communities – both neighborhood and nation. These achievements and contributions further propel the progress of gender equality on the micro and macro levels.

2. What inspired you to get into the nonprofit space?
I live my life in a heart-centric manner, meaning whatever I do, I want to FEEL good about it on all levels: morally, ethically, emotionally and physically. Simply put, I like “doing the right thing”.  Knowing that I have made someone’s life better, if even for a moment, is very important to me. I find that people working in the nonprofit sector go above and beyond on the regular to complete the task, raise another dollar, fight for justice or brighten someone’s day. That truly inspires me and I strive to accomplish those things daily here at UBCF – not only completing tasks, working our mission and serving our clients, but supporting my colleagues and cheering them on as they do their jobs. This work is the definition of Team Effort.  We achieve success in the work we do because each one of our hearts is “all in”.

3. What would you say is your super power (unique quality) that you bring to your organization?
I am deeply loyal and detail-oriented. I take pride in making sure all the little things add up so when the BIG thing is ready to go, we’ve got a solid foundation so we can fly to the greatest heights.

4. What advice would you give to up-and-coming leaders in the nonprofit space?

  • Keep your mission at the heart of all you do; do not shape-shift your organization into something it is not just to “fit” into someone else’s vision (for money, for fame, for that shiny-thing-over-there).
  • Be humble and stay open while true to the heart of your mission.
  • Have a solid sense of what your “end game” is, no matter how small or grand the matter at hand: what do I want to achieve and why am I doing this? Is it helping/ harming the organization? Is there a different way to go about this? Where’s the “YES” !?.
  • Acknowledge and encourage your team. The organization is only as good as the people working there – with and for you (and if it’s just you right now, give yourself that acknowledgment and encouragement, you deserve it!!!).
  • Network with other organizations – you can ALWAYS learn something from others, as in “how to DO or NOT do” something!
  • Don’t forget to take care of yourself on a personal level; self-care is a necessity, not a “maybe”.  Bringing your best self to your organization is the greatest way to honor, respect and execute your organization’s mission and important work.

Nicolette Ortega
Serve the People
www.serve-the-people.com

1. What does International Women’s Day mean to you?
Awareness Day!  A time to celebrate women!

2. What inspired you to get into the nonprofit space?
I felt I could make a difference! Serving others and a community in need felt right!

3. What would you say is your super power (unique quality) that you bring to your organization?
This is a difficult one for me.  I love what I do and love being a part of Serve The People.

4. What advice would you give to up-and-coming leaders in the nonprofit space?
Love and welcome people where they’re at!

Renea Gray, Director
Helping Hands to the Community
hhtc-distribution.org

1. What does International Women’s Day mean to you?
International Women’s Day is a day that women around the world can step back and look at the growth we’ve have made in the world.  This day gives women the chance to network within their community and notice the difference they are making. Women need to realize how they inspire other young women to look inside themselves and to realize they can become apart of the change.

2. What inspired you to get into the nonprofit space?
I was inspired to make a difference in my community when I was 23 years old. I realized if change needs to happen it must start with me. I always think about how can I make it better.

3. What would you say is your super power (unique quality) that you bring to your organization?
Vision, Belief and Faith.

4. What advice would you give to up-and-coming leaders in the nonprofit space?
If you have a dream to make a difference, believe that you can. You have to know you have what it take to complete it. Your dream starts and stops with you.

Jameliah Blount, Founder/Executive Director
Holistically Empowered Youth, Inc
www.heyyouthinc.org

1. What does International Women’s Day mean to you?
The coming together and celebration of all women. A day to reflect on the achievements we have made as well as a moment to refocus on the goals we are still working towards.

2. What inspired you to get into the nonprofit space?
In a world that is ever-changing and many times highlights the negative, there are still people that are here just to serve others. To be light when sometimes all is seen is grey. The everyday ability to help someone move into a better space or at a minimum just have a better day is what inspired me to get into the nonprofit space.

3. What would you say is your super power (unique quality) that you bring to your organization?
My love for people and the strong desire to fill voids where I can. This pushes me and the organization to always look for ways that we can be a resource to those who need it and support other organizations like ourselves to do more and be better at it.

4. What advice would you give to up-and-coming leaders in the nonprofit space?
Don’t give up! There will be a lot of no’s and there will be many people who will love what you are doing but won’t support you. Keep pushing forward because when you least expect it the right people will be there to push and support you. The work doesn’t always get easier but you will build an endurance to keep going.

Shari Rudolph
Shari Rudolph
shari@good360.org

Shari Rudolph is Chief Marketing Officer of Good360 and is an accomplished retail, digital commerce and media executive with a strong track record of building audience, revenue and brands. Shari’s previous experience includes management consulting as well as various executive and leadership roles at both start-ups and large media and retail e-commerce companies in Southern California, New York and Silicon Valley. She is also an adjunct professor teaching classes in marketing, advertising and entrepreneurial studies and she earned her MBA from The Anderson Graduate School of Management at UCLA.



 
// Added by SM - 2019-06-06 // End of SM edits